Quitting for Good: Tricks for Treating Tobacco Dependence

Description

Despite decades of public health initiatives, tobacco use remains the primary leading known cause of preventable death in the United States, killing nearly half a million Americans every year. Adding to the tragedy: More than two-thirds of cigarette smokers want to quit—and more than half report having tried to quit in the past year. Still, relapse remains common.  Pharmacists have a proven positive impact on cessation rates and are strategically positioned to help patients quit. In this session, aided by interactive case studies and virtual patients, presenters will discuss approaches to help patients quit, with an emphasis on re-treatment of current smokers who have a history of unsuccessful quit attempts. Presenters will also discuss the role of electronic nicotine-delivery systems for cessation.  

Pharmacist Learning Objectives

:At the completion of this application-based activity, participants will be able to: 

  1. Describe epidemiologic trends of tobacco use and relapse in the United States over time. 
  2. Summarize recent data on the safety and efficacy of available pharmacological options for treatment of tobacco use and dependence.
  3. Explain the role of electronic nicotine-delivery systems in smoking cessation.
  4. Develop a treatment regimen for patients who have relapsed back to smoking.
  5. Help patients develop coping strategies (cognitive and behavioral) to enhance their chances of quitting successfully. 

Technician Learning Objectives

At the completion of this application-based activity, participants will be able to: 

  1. Describe epidemiologic trends of tobacco use and relapse in the United States over time. 
  2. Summarize recent data on the safety and efficacy of available pharmacological options for treatment of tobacco use and dependence.
  3. Explain the role of electronic nicotine-delivery systems in smoking cessation.
  4. Develop a treatment regimen for patients who have relapsed back to smoking.
  5. Help patients develop coping strategies (cognitive and behavioral) to enhance their chances of quitting successfully. 
 
 
 
Speakers:
Robin
Robin Corelli, PharmD
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
University of California, San Francisco
 
Karen
Karen Hudmon, DrPH, MS, RPh
Professor of Pharmacy Practice
College of Pharmacy Purdue University
 
Learning Level: Level 3
Track: Pharmacist Clinical Patient Care Services
Session Time Slot(s): 
Date: 
Monday, March 23
Time: 
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Room: 
Gaylord National Resort - National Harbor 6-7
CEUs Pharmacist: 0.2
CEUs Pharmacy Technician: 0.2
Activity Type:
Application-based